Wear sunblock!

I’m not crazy about the sun, or the outdoors in general (thinking about our tanning culture gives me a headache). When I do go outdoors, I wear a 45+ SPF sunblock. I’ve been pretty diligent about using sunblock with Jack but Joe has not been as good about it. It drives me NUTS, especially since his father died of melanoma and both my mom and grandma have had skin cancer removed from their faces. Our family should be on top of this, damn it!

I doubt it’s much of a surprise to anyone to hear that many people do not wear enough sunblock. But it is quite shocking to find out that most sunblocks do not contain the proper ingredients to ward off cancer-causing UVA rays. And even I, an extremely sun-cautious individual, did not realize that it takes a good 20-30 minutes before sunblock is even effective.

Let’s be better about the sunblock, okay? Better yet, stay in the shade!

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Comments

  1. It’s interesting to me how lazy/trusting our culture is, that we say “oh, it will protect me from the sun? Excellent” and never think to actually find out if it’s doing it’s job.

  2. It’s interesting to me how lazy/trusting our culture is, that we say “oh, it will protect me from the sun? Excellent” and never think to actually find out if it’s doing it’s job.

  3. Absolutely – that is so funny. The people that get me, though, are the ones who still deliberately tan! At this point with the ozone the way it is, it’s not a matter IF they will get cancer, but when.

  4. Absolutely – that is so funny. The people that get me, though, are the ones who still deliberately tan! At this point with the ozone the way it is, it’s not a matter IF they will get cancer, but when.

  5. not only that, but the protection from anything more than spf 15 is a crock because you have to reapply it every 90-120 mins anyway. unless you can’t be in the sun for 6-8 MINUTES without burning, spf 15 is all you need, anything more is just more money and more chemicals.

  6. given that my husband is the brother of your husband, i agree with you 100%. i’m like the SPF gestapo in our house– J doesn’t get to go outside unless he’s wearing sunblock. joe at least wears a hat a lot of the time, but his legs and arms are still exposed and it makes sense for you to be concerned about it.

    what has worked well in convincing J that he should wear SPF is reminding him that his dad left him and his family way too early and i’ll be damned if i let that happen to my family. it might work with joe too… simply reminding him that he shares his dad’s genetics and does he want to leave his wife and kid behind too? (ok, so it’s guilt, but guilt has its uses). of course, J has no excuse for refusing when i’m the one who’s so nutty about sublock, since i’m naturally pretty dark and don’t burn.

    the other thing that has helped is trying lots of different types of SPF formulations. J likes the spray versions the best. i like nongreasy lotions. we keep between 3-5 types in the house at any time, depending on the situation. it’s the “you have no excuse” approach to SPF use!

  7. Jen, I’ve never had good luck with a low SPF, but it’s most likely just that I’ve had crappy sunscreens since I hate paying big money for that stuff. You raise a good point.

    SBR, good idea keeping tons in the house. I mentioned all of this to Joe last night and he was surprised to hear it. He’s so thick-headed about sunscreen – he thinks that because he wears a hat he is totally protected. He also doesn’t like the smell or feel of sunscreen. UGH – he works outside! He should be better about this! I am so going to use your argument.

  8. If Joe has a family history he should definitely be careful. He should also remember that most clothing does not provide protection as good as sunscreen. Here is what the Skin Cancer Foundation says about clothing.

    I’ve heard about certain high SPFs not being any more effective but I’ve always heard 30 is the magic number. I looked at SkinDeep and the Skin Cancer Foundation websites and they were pretty much in agreement.

    “SPF 15 blocks approximately 93 percent of all incoming UVB rays. SPF 30 blocks 97 percent; and SPF 50 blocks 99 percent. They may seem like negligible differences, but if you are light-sensitive, or have a history of skin cancer, those extra percentages will make a difference. And as you can see, no sunscreen can block all UV rays”

    I am a huge fan of the spray sunscreens, even if you still have to rub them in. I feel like I can spread them more evenly. I’ve been using the Aveeno spray which is apparently great with the sun protection, not so great in the chemical dept.

  9. Wow, Beth – I looked at that website but they don’t have the sunscreen list updated with sunscreens that carry helioplex or mexoryl. Hmmm…

  10. Yeah, noticed that. I’m not going to hold it against them though. Most of the websites I looked at today haven’t changed their info based on the study which isn’t surprising seeing as it was just released yesterday. Even when I tried to search Google news for an article I mostly found local news sites. As usual people will challenge the study and it will inspire new ones. This is after all just one study (not that I’m arguing with it). Isn’t science great? 🙂

  11. Neutrogena as a spray version and a “dry touch” version that both have helioplex.

    J doesn’t like the feel of sunblock either, that’s why we have so many types!

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