Let’s Talk About Measles

There is an outbreak in the US. And it’s in California. And, more specifically, measles are in the county I live in. Patients have been treated for measles at the hospital where Jack receives chemotherapy treatment, even.

I’ve been really good about not freaking out, even though I have every right to freak out. I have no explanation for why I am not coming completely unhinged as the news reports more and more measles cases every day.

Both of my kids are in danger. Desmond, at 5 months, is too young for the MMR vaccine and chemotherapy has wiped out Jack’s immune system – including many, if not all, of the immunities he used to have. Jack attends public school and Dez goes to daycare. Jack won’t be able to get the live virus vaccines (MMR & Chickenpox) until a year post-treatment – so, March 2016. Dez will receive his immunizations after his first birthday in September (at least, I think that’s the case – Jack’s health status may delay that!).

Until then, it feels like my kids are sitting ducks.

I know there is a debate right now about keeping unvaccinated (by choice) kids out of schools. I am not convinced we can require everyone to vaccinate, but frankly, I am not arguing against making it mandatory to attend public school – it would certainly make me feel better to know that Jack was that much more protected against a nasty disease that could kill him while going about normal life.

At the same time, I can see the case being made that immuno-suppressed kids be kept out of school, too. I mean, the measles could kill Jack. So why wouldn’t I sequester him?

How can I do that, though? How can I take more away from Jack? He has missed out on so much over the last three years. He has fought so hard to beat cancer and to live as normal a life as possible. He missed half of kindergarten and first grade and so many other days of school, and it has had an impact on his educational performance, as well as his self-esteem. I don’t want to take more away from him!

Further, he’s in danger at places besides school. When I took him to the oncology clinic a couple of weeks ago, we were advised to put a mask on him while in the elevator because there were measles patients being treated at that hospital.

It hadn’t occurred to me that he would be in danger at the oncology office, of all places! And, COME ON! It’s 2015! Measles has no place being on the top 10 list of things I worry about!

In any case, have you ever tried to keep a mask on an 8-year-old? It’s near impossible for longer than 20-30 minutes. And what about a drooling, grabby 5-month-old? That’s just plain crazy-making! (It’s a fun idea for a party game, though.)

So, what I’m saying is…I’m relying pretty heavily on those around me to keep themselves – and us – safe. I’m relying on herd immunity to protect my kids from vaccine-preventable disease because I am powerless at this point.

And, unfortunately, there are many in my community that don’t even think of my kids when they refuse vaccinations. Instead, they think measles is not a big threat to them. They think a vaccine is more dangerous than the disease itself.

All I can think is…is this real life?

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  1. Your thoughts are my thoughts as well. So frustrating. People who don’t vaccinate see through a very small window and don’t really see the big picture. And our kids who have had cancer are a part of that big picture. As our everyone’s babies.

  2. Depressing to discover another side-effect of stupidity. Hope things turn out well for you and I hope you persuade a few idiots to vaccinate.

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