IEPs Are A Full Time Job

We got the results from the school’s academic and psychological assessments of Jack on Wednesday. It’s 18 pages of assessment results that seem to require a degree in childhood education to understand. I’ve read and re-read the information and googled¬† my little heart out, but it’s still not clear what it all means.

On the academic assessment, the only issue that showed up was “math fluency” where he rated low average, and a slightly low score (but still considered average) in oral reading comprehension.

For the psycheducational assessments, he’s all over the board. Scores range from ‘borderline’ or ‘at risk’ on the low end to ‘superior’ or ‘above expected level.’ Jack hits every level in some area, which I think is what prompted this note:

“Jack’s unique set of thinking and reasoning abilities make his [cognitive functioning assessment scores] difficult to interpret.”

That is great! And yet…not-so-great. I love that my kid is unique, but being unique makes it quite difficult to identify how to help him be successful in school.

There are many notes throughout the pages of results that state “attention fluctuated” or “drifted off.” This is uneducated speculation on my part, but I’m guessing this is leading to an ADD diagnosis. (He was assessed for this through Kaiser recently, as well, but we don’t have the results back yet. In talking to his dad about the information and going through the process, I think we both feel Jack is likely to be diagnosed with ADD – just without the hyperactive part.)

One thing in the assessment results that stuck out was: “Jack exhibits a processing disorder in the area of attention that is affecting his classroom performance.”

From what I understand from the document and some googling, “slow processing” is a THING but it may or may not be considered a learning disorder (I think that depends on each district’s interpretation). And then, because of the part that says “in the area of attention,” it’s unclear whether this is just a result of something like ADD or if there is something else going on, too.

In any case, the assessments are helping with focusing on areas where Jack needs some help, either through accommodations (like more time to complete tasks) or some sort of specialized education. Naturally, most of what is described is not news to us at all, but it’s helpful to see where Jack is NOT having problems so that we can identify what the likely issues are that need to be addressed.

I guess I’m learning that IEP assessments are not cut and dry – which is why, I guess, there is nothing in these documents that say “your child has a learning disability” or “he qualifies for special education services.”

So, the following things were identified and may represent the source behind the low math and oral reading comprehension scores:

Processing Speed Score (WISC IV): Borderline (lowest score)
Narrative Memory (NEPSY II): Borderline (second lowest score)

Behavioral Issues (based on the Behavioral Assessment Scale for Children 2):

Internalizing Problems – Clinically Significant
Attention Problems – At Risk
School Problems – At Risk
Behavioral Symptoms – At Risk & Clinically Significant

We have a meeting with the IEP team next week to go over what all of this means specifically for Jack. Until then, I will continue to google my little heart out to try to wrap my head around all of this. In addition, I was able to get in touch with a case manager from Kaiser’s Psych department who will attend the meeting with us and be an advocate for Jack. Thank goodness!

I am hopeful that many of these issues will fade away as the chemo leaves Jack’s body; however, it’s good to be prepared in case they don’t. And, of course, there are late effects that can pop up long after treatment is over, as well. Sigh.

For those of you who have IEPs for your children, what resources do you use to prepare for these meetings and help your child navigate areas of weakness? I would LOVE tips!

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  1. After 14 + years of navigating special education, I know that the very best resource (generally) is Wright’s Law – – and specifically, the publication “From Emotions to Advocacy” ( 2nd Ed). Your library can likely get you the publication, but it’s well worth investing in the $20 cost if you’ll be navigating the system for the remainder of Jack’s education.

    • Thank you! I’ve looked a bit at (specifically when the school tried to say he was performing too well to qualify for services – they were wrong) but I need to do more reading now that I have a little bit more knowledge about what is going on. I’ll check out that book, too!

  2. SO glad to hear that Kaiser is going to go with you to the IEP meeting. From my experience, I’ve seen KP (in particular) be great advocates. <3

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