The Rest of His Life

We had our post-treatment conference with Jack’s oncology team last week. Each family unit was given an Off-Treatment binder.


Right inside the binder is an Old Irish blessing:

May the road rise to meet you
May the wind always be at your back
May the sun shine warm upon your face,
The rains fall soft upon your fields.

We were given information on long-term follow-up guidelines, which includes the following:

  • Introduction to Long-term Follow-up
  • Emotional Issues after Childhood Cancer
  • Health Promotion through Diet and Physical Activity
  • Education Issues after Childhood Cancer
  • Male Health Issues After Childhood Cancer
  • Dental Health
  • Kidney/Bladder Health
  • Liver Health
  • Bone Health
  • Avascular Necrosis
  • Skin Health
  • Heart Problems Following Treatment for Childhood Cancer
  • Cataracts/Eye Problems after Childhood Cancer
  • Peripheral Neuropathy
  • Raynaud’s Phenomenon
  • Reducing the Risk of Second Cancers

Jack will continue with post-treatment check-ups for the rest of his life – he’ll be seen every month for the first year, then every 2 months for the second year, every 3 months for the third year, every 6 months for the fourth year, and then yearly after that. He will get blood tests run at every visit. Every 5 years he’ll also get an echocardiogram to monitor his heart for abnormalities that may show up.

Due to both the cancer itself and the treatment for it, Jack is at greater risk for developing all kinds of things, and the oncology team reinforced the fact that any time Jack goes to see a new doctor, that physician needs to be informed about exactly what type of treatment Jack received and how much. We were told that MOST physicians will need to be educated by us or Jack because most will not have ever treated a childhood cancer survivor.

In September (six months post-treatment), Jack will start the process of being re-vaccinated for everything he already received pre-diagnosis.

Kaiser sent a referral for a full neuropsychological evaluation with an outside psychologist. We’ve scheduled appointments for that after the school year ends since the testing takes 6-8 hours. It’s split into four sessions over about a month’s time, and the results will hopefully give us some insight into how Jack’s brain has been affected by cancer treatment and guidance on how to help him in school and life.

Now that treatment is over, a lot of our focus is on dealing with the emotional impacts of the last three years. We have an immediate problem to address, which is to figure out how to get Jack’s lab draws done. We were unable to acquire a blood draw last week because of the extreme anxiety and panic Jack experienced when we went to the lab.

Now, let me be clear: this is beyond fear – it is Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder. Jack went into the lab armed with all kinds of tools to help deal with the pain of the needle (yes, we had the Buzzy!), but once he was in the lab chair and the tech started to prep him, something took over in his brain and he went rigid, started shaking and thrashing, and crying and screaming. He couldn’t hear anything we were trying to say to him, could not process our words, and could not be held still even with two of us trying. I put the Buzzy on his arm, and yet he kept screaming, “I need the Buzzy!” He just couldn’t even feel it – he was somewhere else entirely. The experience was a lot like his night terrors – we were powerless to help him and the lab techs ultimately decided it was not safe to try to stick a needle in his arm.

It’s heartbreaking to see Jack going through this. It’s also necessary to monitor his blood counts because if the cancer was going to come back, it’s prime time for it to do so now that the chemo is leaving his body. (According to the Dana-Farber Institute & Boston Children’s Hospital, between 15 and 20% of children who are treated for ALL and achieve an initial complete remission will have the disease return.) He still has complaints about feeling unwell from time to time and a CBC is the best way to see what is going on with him.

So we’re in search of a therapist who can help us. Unfortunately, this is not covered by our insurance. Kaiser has great mental health classes, but when it comes to long-term or intensive therapy programs, they are sorely lacking (they even have to refer patients outside of the system for the neuropsych eval, something that they do for every childhood cancer patient). Continuity of care only goes so far with them. It’s on us to figure out the best, most expedient way to get help without going broke. (And what if therapy doesn’t work? What then?)

Even aside from the immediate problem of getting Jack to be able to take blood draws, there are clearly emotional scars that need addressing. We’ve tried play therapy with an outside therapist and then short-term CBT within Kaiser and had limited success. Some healing simply takes time, but he will still need professional help to learn how to process his experiences and be less controlled by his anxieties.

So, treatment is over but life after cancer stretches before us. It’s a new journey – a better journey than the previous one, but not without its own challenges. Thankfully, Jack is a fierce and determined survivor.


“He’s watching us all with the eye of the tiger…”

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  1. Jennifer says:

    Wow! You got a bunch of post-treatment information that we didn’t. And it sounds like more follow-up than we have, too.
    I hope you find someone to help him manage his stress and worries. Very hard to see these kids suffer with this anxiety. Our younger daughter (who was almost 2 when her sister was diagnosed) has been the one to suffer from anxiety and separation issues with us. She has seen a psychologist and she’s only 6.
    Wishing Jack all the best!

    • I’m so sorry your younger one is dealing with anxiety! It’s tough to be the sibling, I have heard. I’m glad you’ve taken her to see someone!

  2. That picture of Jack at the end is SO perfect. I love it. He is such a fighter.

    I know you will be supportive of him as you work through the PTSD and all the after-effects of undergoing such serious treatment. That is a huge thing – having the support, and a safe place to be while you work through the emotions, fear, and pain. I hope you are able to find someone great who can work with you on the money situation so Jack can get the therapy he needs.

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