A Much-Needed Date Night

Since Desmond’s birth in September of last year, David and I have been out alone ONE TIME. That’s right, one measly time in over 8 months. And do you know what we chose to do that time?

We went to the movies.

Now, we like the movies but it’s not exactly quality time. We couldn’t talk to one another and we didn’t even see something romantic. We saw Birdman (it was weird – but good – and not in the least bit romantic). Afterward we ate at a crummy Thai place and then went home. The night was more about checking a task off our list than it was about spending time with one another.

That was back at the beginning of February, so we have been in dire need of a real date night – with time to connect and be US! The problem was that we didn’t have a babysitter to call. Believe it or not, I haven’t actually used a babysitter since Jack was about a year old! I’ve always relied on friends or just stayed home. (Mostly the latter.)

Enter UrbanSitter. I signed up to become a member and was instantly able to search for someone who had infant experience, was CPR-certified (because Dez is putting everything in his mouth he can get his hands on!), and had a background check on the website (I’m a little on the paranoid side). I filtered the results further by searching for sitters close to my house and those that are known through my local parent networks (in this area, Berkeley Parents Network is a go-to for all kinds of things!).

When I connected my account to Facebook, I saw that some of the sitters in my area had been hired by my friends! Further, I got a personalized welcome email from a representative with the site who provided recommendations .

I searched and found a couple of babysitters in my price range that I wanted to interview, and I also posted my request for a sitter on the Jobs section of the website. Almost immediately, responses from sitters who were interested in the job started rolling in! I selected a couple more babysitters to interview from that pool of people.

The phone interviews were super easy to schedule – sitters plug their schedules into a calendar on the website and keep them up to date, so you can look directly at the individual calendars, find a time that works, and click to request the interview spot. The sitters then log in and confirm the time – then the site emails a confirmation with contact information. Easy peasy.

Every interview (four total) went perfectly. It was a tough choice and ultimately the person I choose had to cancel a couple days later when she got sick (which, I completely appreciate – we’ve had so much illness in our house already). By that time, the other sitters I had interviewed had all taken other jobs, but it was not a problem at all! I ran a search again with the date/time I needed plugged into the search parameters, and found a couple more sitters who were available on short notice. I scheduled two interviews and ended up booking the first person I spoke with right over the phone!

Meet Jane (yes, that’s her real name). She is a nanny, a former non-profit employee, and a future Waldorf teacher.

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Jane and a peacefully sleeping Dez

Dez took to her within 5 minutes of her (perfectly on-time) arrival. She was warm and friendly and started playing with him right away. We chatted and got to know one another for a good 20 minutes, then David and I took off for our date night. Dez didn’t even make a peep when we walked out the door – he was completely absorbed with the strings on Jane’s hoodie.

We had a blast! We went to a wine & tapas bar close to our house and treated ourselves to everything our bellies desired. We talked about anything and everything (podcasts, vacation, plans for our house and future), somehow managing to branch out beyond the topic of our kids. We were able to truly relax and enjoy ourselves for the first time in months!

Cheers

A toast to us!

After dinner, I checked in with Jane just to make sure Dez hadn’t turned into a monster while I was gone. He had fallen asleep and all was well. David and I then hopped over to another restaurant for dessert, Prosecco, and coffee. I will admit that I got a bit tipsy (but it was totally worth it!).

When we arrived back home, I thanked Jane, paid her with my credit card through the UrbanSitter app, and David drove her to BART while I snuggled with my baby.

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Nighttime snuggles!

Dez slept super well that night and we couldn’t have been more pleased with our experience. UrbanSitter may have just saved our marriage, you guys (or, at least, our sanity)!

I highly recommend the site for your next date night or quick getaway. You can find all kinds of care for your child – in advance, last minute, overnight – and have access to wonderful caregivers who are reviewed by other parents or have a background check. If you use the code FORFREETRIAL when you sign up for your UrbanSitter account you can get a free month to try it out (normally membership is $14.95 per month).

When is the last time you went on a date night or had some precious personal time?

I was selected for this opportunity as a member of Clever Girls and the content and opinions expressed here are all my own.

Leaving Chemo Behind

I notice more changes in Jack every day as the chemo starts leaving his body. Most of these changes are good, and others are not so good but are likely temporary.

I have to say that as much as I want to leave chemo – and the whole experience of cancer – behind us, I can’t help but be reflective. We lived with treatment for more than three years and much of it became routine (albeit unpleasant routine). Suddenly we are in a different routine and even though it’s a normal life routine (mostly), it’s new again and quite a change. And even though we’ve lived with a regular life routine before, it’s new to us because we have been so changed by Jack’s illness.

So please bear with me as I continue to write about living with – and after – cancer. There is still so much to process.

Jack and Dez

Jack and Dez

 
The first change I noticed in Jack after chemotherapy ended was the increase in his energy level. Less than a week after ending treatment, he woke up on his own and popped out of bed with all of the vigor of his pre-cancer self. Now, he doesn’t jump out of bed ready to face the day every morning, but most mornings he is fairly easy to rouse now. As I posted on Facebook the first day this astonishing thing happened – when you have a young child, you spend a good deal of time wishing they wouldn’t wake up so damned early every day. That wish changes when you have a chronically ill child who sleeps in every day.

So even if he is back to waking up early on weekends, I have a new appreciation for the early rising!

With that said, MY energy level has not increased in alignment with Jack’s! As much as I’m celebrating the return of my kid’s bright-eyed and bushy-tailed side, I am also finding myself wishing for quiet and solitude more often. It feels like all of the energy Jack couldn’t muster over the last three years has simply been stored up and waiting…and now it’s a flood.

I’m hoping his energy level will get to be a bit more manageable with time. I am sick of hearing myself tell him to please stop shrieking like a raptor or to not be so wild and IN his brother’s face. Sigh.

Today as I felt a headache coming on, it occurred to me that I hadn’t heard Jack complain of a headache in a while. While on chemo, he essentially lived with a headache all the time. He got used to it and only asked for Tylenol when it got particularly bad – that tended to happen 1-3 times a week. When I asked Jack today when the last time was that he had a headache, he couldn’t remember. That’s a good thing!

Jack’s body is getting rid of the chemo in a physically noticeable way, as well. The meds had dried out his skin quite a bit, damaged the nail beds on his two big toes, and interfered with the process of normal skin shedding, creating some discoloration in areas. He also became extra sensitive to the sun, so even limited sun exposure resulted in him being very tan (and looking like a raccoon when he takes off his glasses). Now his skin is reacting to the lack of chemo in his system – his throat has broken out in an itchy rash (mild but still annoying) and it has edged up to his cheeks a bit. His lips have become chapped, as well, and he is even thirstier than he was when on the chemo. Clearly his body is trying to get rid of the junk and work on repairing itself.

That is also clear in the amazing increase to Jack’s appetite! He has eaten like a bird the last three years and since he was diagnosed at 5.5 years old, he has gained only about 8lbs (and didn’t consistency maintain that). He has gotten taller during that time, but no matter how we tried to add in calories in the absence of a decent appetite, he has remained on the disturbingly thin side. 

We don’t really have to worry about adding calories now – we just need to keep the fridge and pantry stocked. Jack eats ALL.THE.TIME. He wakes up starving, he eats everything in his lunch (whereas before we threw away so much of it that he didn’t eat), and he snacks constantly. All his meals are bigger now and he generally clears his plate. And then asks for more. He is kind of a human garbage disposal now!
I’m looking forward to his knees being less knobby even though that means I’m also going to be spending a ton on new clothes.

It’s kind of a strange time. I had expected life to calm down with the end of treatment but it hasn’t quite done so. It’s better, but it will still take time to let go and settle into life post-treatment.

Reconstructing The Past

Jack is starting therapy soon to address the post-traumatic stress issues that are causing us all concern. The short term goal is to address the  needle phobia associated with it, which is more accurately described as a “lab-induced panic spiral,” but ultimately he has a LOT of anxiety that controls him and if we could ease that even a little bit, I’ll consider it a WIN.

There are a lot of forms to fill out when you go to any sort of specialist, so I’ve filled out so many pages my hands have gone numb and started aching (seriously). Forms for the IEP evaluation, forms for the neuropsychological evaluation, forms for the ADHD assessment, and now forms for this new therapy.

They are all similar, but different. They all include questions about the past – and this is where I pat myself on the back for keeping records (something I’m less good about with Desmond – arg!) about Jack’s younger years. I have my blog, a baby book, the CaringBridge journal, and many, many pictures. I use all of these things to answer the endless questions and reconstruct the past because my own memory is full of emotion, which can often be difficult to explain in words.

I’ve spoken with the oncology team, the social worker, the child life specialist, several therapists, and all of Jack’s other parents (of course) about the best way to move forward and address this issue. I’m the collector of information and the main distributor. Perhaps this is because I’m a writer, or because I’m a mother, or some combination of things. It’s a little bit odd that it’s me in this role, though, because my memory in general resembles swiss cheese – some memories are perfectly in tact and others are just GONE. Still, it’s up to me and somehow I’m making it work.

This whole Leukemia business started with some general sickness and then a blood test. That blood test was traumatic – for me and Jack. He was 5 and had never had one done. He had never liked needles, but he didn’t spend a lot of time thinking about them…until that day when I had to hold him down and lock my legs around him in order to keep him still for the lab tech to insert the needle (note: always ask for a pediatric phlebotomist for your child!).

I know intellectually that he screamed and cried but I don’t have a specific memory of that part – that part of my inner film is a gaping hole. Holding down my screaming child while he was being hurt was too horrible to remember clearly, so I locked it up and threw away the key.

That night, Jack had his first night terror. I’d never seen one before (in Jack or in anyone) and it scared the crap out of me! I thought it was a seizure. I didn’t connect it to the blood draw at all, even though I knew the blood draw had been traumatizing. I wasn’t thinking very clearly at the time, after all.

But I’m thinking clearly now (mostly). And after filling out a ton of questionnaires and recounting all of the methods we’ve tried and reading over various records of that time when Jack was diagnosed and having witnessed several night terrors (that are pretty much always the same – screaming, thrashing, pleading “No no no no no! Mom! No!”) – all the dots finally connected enough for me to wrap my brain around it.

That initial blood draw, and then the wave of awfulness that followed (more blood draws, an IV, surgery, an MRI, x-rays, platelet infusion, cancer diagnosis – all within the span of 4 days), was the catalyst for this ‘needle phobia.’

Knowing all I know about mental health and having lived with PTSD for decades myself, it still took me this long to wrap my head around what happened to get us to a point where Jack can NOT STAND a blood draw. Stopping to think about it makes it clear to me – OF COURSE he is terrified of blood draws. Every time he sits down and holds his arm out to a white-coated person, he is transported back to that time 3 years ago. The emotions and blurred memories of a terrified 5 year old rush back to him and suddenly he is reliving the collection of medical traumas he’s endured since he first got sick.

Even though he’s 8 now, he is still not much more equipped to handle all of that now than he was then. To him, a needle is not just a needle – it is so much more terrifying that a sharp piece of metal. To Jack, a needle represents a 3-year battle for his life. And that battle has ended, but the winner is still unclear. The cancer is gone, but we don’t know for sure that’s it gone for good and that uncertainty leads to anxiety.

With cancer out of the way, the emotions that were pushed to the background over the last few years have resurfaced and they’re kind of taking over. Jack’s had two night terrors in the last week. His anxiety is at a high again and he has a weird, nervous energy about him that he seems unable to control. He has complained several times of “feeling like he’s going under anesthesia,” which I’ve gleaned is likely some sort of dissociation, and it comes upon him at random times.

Jack brain is reconstructing the past whether he wants it to or not. And my job as his parent is to help him get the tools to understand and resolve it.

To therapy we go.

Boy Of The Year

I’m writing to invite Jack to become an official Honoree for one of our campaigns: the Man & Woman of the Year. Man & Woman of the Year campaign is a national ten-week campaign where individuals compete to raise funds to help find cures for blood cancers. Candidates run in honor of the Boy & Girl of the Year, who are local blood cancer patients and survivors and sources of inspirations to others. The Boy and Girl represent thousands of patients who have been helped by LLS’s patient services and research, they are recognized at all events, in campaign marketing materials and on the LLS website.

I received the above from the Leukemia & Lymphoma Society at the end of January. I wanted to speak with Jack before agreeing to anything, as I knew it could go either way – on one hand, he loves to be helpful and I knew he would get a kick out of being “Boy of the Year.” On the other hand, he doesn’t much like talking about his experience with cancer and sometimes avoids being the center of attention. When I sat down to talk with him about it, however, I didn’t even finish the explanation before he exclaimed, “I’ll do it!” He was thrilled to be given this opportunity and said he would attend events, give interviews, anything they wanted him to do!

So, we agreed to participate in the program and Jack officially became the 2015 Boy of the Year for the Northern California Greater Bay Area chapter of the Leukemia & Lymphoma Society.

Photos by Colson Griffith Photography - www.colsongriffith.com

Jack and the Girl of the Year (Celia) get along wonderfully! Seeing them together at the events, it’s clear that the LLS chose the right kids as honorees. They are both so full of life and sweet as can be. They absolutely hold their own at the events we’ve attended, and they stick together like they’ve known each other all their lives. The bond was immediate.

"Photos by Colson Griffith Photography - www.colsongriffith.com"

At the kickoff event we attended, I spoke briefly about our experience when Jack was diagnosed while Jack stood next to me and imitated everything I said. The crowd LOVED him.

"Photos by Colson Griffith Photography - www.colsongriffith.com"

I also mentioned the fact that when we found out Jack had cancer, the oncologist told us that ALL was “the best kind of cancer” to have. What she meant was that ALL is highly curable in children, but at the time this led me to think that maybe Jack would receive 6 months of treatment and then we could go on with our lives. That was so not the case (as you know) and so it was a second blow when I learned it would be more than 3 years of treatment. I emphasized this in my brief speech and I am emphasizing it again – this is why we need organizations like the Leukemia & Lymphoma Society and all of the research and fundraising! Three years of treatment is too long for anyone, but especially for children.

Maybe with the help of LLS, we can get to  a 6-month treatment for these kids – if we can’t wipe out this horrendous disease altogether!

"Photos by Colson Griffith Photography - www.colsongriffith.com"

“We need YOUR help!”

This is why this campaign – very hopefully named Mission Possible – is important and why we are very happy to be part of it and promote the cause to wipe out blood cancers. We hope you’ll support the cause, as well, by donating to the Leukemia & Lymphoma Society, attending an event put on by Man & Woman of the Year candidates, and/or by purchasing tickets to attend the Grand Finale event at The Fairmont in San Francisco on June 6 (we’ll be there!). By supporting LLS’s efforts, you are supporting families like ours – and like yours.

"Photos by Colson Griffith Photography - www.colsongriffith.com"

All About That Baby

Desmond is 8 months old. I just…how? How is he 8 months old already? He’s like a real person! He loves and laughs and chases our pets and has thoroughly become an integral part of our family.

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He is 18 lbs, 9 oz and 28″ long. He is in 12 month clothing.

The positional plagiocephaly we were monitoring has been downgraded from moderate to mild. It’s almost gone completely!

He’s been crawling for a while now. It started with creeping around 6 months and now he does a weird combo of the army crawl and an inchworm type of thing. He’s clearly got his own way of doing things. He is starting to climb, too. He can climb right over me to get to an electronic device or the dog.

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He likes the sounds of rattles, crinkly toys, and honking toys, and he goes directly for a hard surface whenever he can to smack it or bang a block against it. He pushes toys and books through the bars of his crib.

We’ve started solid foods, albeit slowly. He is enthusiastic, even if he doesn’t exactly seem to like anything I give him. The exception to that would be when I recently let him nom on part of my pizza. He LOVED that.

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He is teething hardcore. Any day now his two bottom middle teeth are going to sprout. ANY DAY.

He is totally interactive now. He can hide under a blanket for a bit of “Where’s Desmond?” and he loves to knock over towers.

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He grabs noses and smooshes his face into mine, gumming my cheek and drooling all over me. He loves to copy a fake laugh. He is very chatty, as well. He says a lot of “di da di da da.” Sometimes this can be disruptive, like when we’re trying to watch TV or sleep at 6am.

He started clapping two days ago.

He loves his big brother. Every time he sees him, he starts laughing proactively; he knows Jack will do something crazy to entertain him!

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Jack, Desmond, and cousin Sabrina

Altogether, he’s pretty awesome. I think we’ll keep him.

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The Rest of His Life

We had our post-treatment conference with Jack’s oncology team last week. Each family unit was given an Off-Treatment binder.

binder

Right inside the binder is an Old Irish blessing:

May the road rise to meet you
May the wind always be at your back
May the sun shine warm upon your face,
The rains fall soft upon your fields.

We were given information on long-term follow-up guidelines, which includes the following:

  • Introduction to Long-term Follow-up
  • Emotional Issues after Childhood Cancer
  • Health Promotion through Diet and Physical Activity
  • Education Issues after Childhood Cancer
  • Male Health Issues After Childhood Cancer
  • Dental Health
  • Kidney/Bladder Health
  • Liver Health
  • Bone Health
  • Avascular Necrosis
  • Skin Health
  • Heart Problems Following Treatment for Childhood Cancer
  • Cataracts/Eye Problems after Childhood Cancer
  • Peripheral Neuropathy
  • Raynaud’s Phenomenon
  • Reducing the Risk of Second Cancers

Jack will continue with post-treatment check-ups for the rest of his life – he’ll be seen every month for the first year, then every 2 months for the second year, every 3 months for the third year, every 6 months for the fourth year, and then yearly after that. He will get blood tests run at every visit. Every 5 years he’ll also get an echocardiogram to monitor his heart for abnormalities that may show up.

Due to both the cancer itself and the treatment for it, Jack is at greater risk for developing all kinds of things, and the oncology team reinforced the fact that any time Jack goes to see a new doctor, that physician needs to be informed about exactly what type of treatment Jack received and how much. We were told that MOST physicians will need to be educated by us or Jack because most will not have ever treated a childhood cancer survivor.

In September (six months post-treatment), Jack will start the process of being re-vaccinated for everything he already received pre-diagnosis.

Kaiser sent a referral for a full neuropsychological evaluation with an outside psychologist. We’ve scheduled appointments for that after the school year ends since the testing takes 6-8 hours. It’s split into four sessions over about a month’s time, and the results will hopefully give us some insight into how Jack’s brain has been affected by cancer treatment and guidance on how to help him in school and life.

Now that treatment is over, a lot of our focus is on dealing with the emotional impacts of the last three years. We have an immediate problem to address, which is to figure out how to get Jack’s lab draws done. We were unable to acquire a blood draw last week because of the extreme anxiety and panic Jack experienced when we went to the lab.

Now, let me be clear: this is beyond fear – it is Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder. Jack went into the lab armed with all kinds of tools to help deal with the pain of the needle (yes, we had the Buzzy!), but once he was in the lab chair and the tech started to prep him, something took over in his brain and he went rigid, started shaking and thrashing, and crying and screaming. He couldn’t hear anything we were trying to say to him, could not process our words, and could not be held still even with two of us trying. I put the Buzzy on his arm, and yet he kept screaming, “I need the Buzzy!” He just couldn’t even feel it – he was somewhere else entirely. The experience was a lot like his night terrors – we were powerless to help him and the lab techs ultimately decided it was not safe to try to stick a needle in his arm.

It’s heartbreaking to see Jack going through this. It’s also necessary to monitor his blood counts because if the cancer was going to come back, it’s prime time for it to do so now that the chemo is leaving his body. (According to the Dana-Farber Institute & Boston Children’s Hospital, between 15 and 20% of children who are treated for ALL and achieve an initial complete remission will have the disease return.) He still has complaints about feeling unwell from time to time and a CBC is the best way to see what is going on with him.

So we’re in search of a therapist who can help us. Unfortunately, this is not covered by our insurance. Kaiser has great mental health classes, but when it comes to long-term or intensive therapy programs, they are sorely lacking (they even have to refer patients outside of the system for the neuropsych eval, something that they do for every childhood cancer patient). Continuity of care only goes so far with them. It’s on us to figure out the best, most expedient way to get help without going broke. (And what if therapy doesn’t work? What then?)

Even aside from the immediate problem of getting Jack to be able to take blood draws, there are clearly emotional scars that need addressing. We’ve tried play therapy with an outside therapist and then short-term CBT within Kaiser and had limited success. Some healing simply takes time, but he will still need professional help to learn how to process his experiences and be less controlled by his anxieties.

So, treatment is over but life after cancer stretches before us. It’s a new journey – a better journey than the previous one, but not without its own challenges. Thankfully, Jack is a fierce and determined survivor.

TigerJack

“He’s watching us all with the eye of the tiger…”

End of Treatment!

Jack’s been off treatment for over a month! I’ve been terribly remiss in posting about it here. We took a few pictures, though. The first is his last day of chemotherapy in the clinic. The second marks the last day of oral chemotherapy altogether!

We’ve already seen a big difference in Jack. He is full of so much energy now! He has a huge (it seems to us, anyway) appetite! He’s waking up on his own a lot in the mornings rather than needing to be dragged out of bed. It’s AWESOME!

His Broviac catheter has been removed from his chest, as well. That is both good and bad. Good because we don’t have to go to the ER for a fever anymore and we don’t have to worry about dressing changes! Bad because it means now Jack needs to get blood draws with a needle from now on…

And he is deathly afraid of needles.

We tried to get labs drawn this week and it was a miserable failure. We are now looking at finding a therapist who specializes in EMDR (a therapy used for PTSD) in kids to deal with the trauma issues he has developed. We need to get this done soon and quickly! We can also try a finger prick approach, but I am not convinced that will work any better than a needle in the arm. Even if it does, he needs more therapy – his fears and nightmares (and NIGHT TERRORS) are still terrible.

So, that’s where we’re at with that. We are celebrating the end of treatment tomorrow by hosting a party in Tilden Park. Jack has come up with some cancer-themed games he wants to play and we’ll eat, drink, and toast to the fact that we survived the last 3+ years!!

Fuck cancer, y’all.

An Uncommon Mother’s Day (Review)

Note: This is a sponsored blog post. In exchange for blogging about my experience with UncommonGoods, I received a free product to review. All opinions expressed are my own.

Mother’s Day is coming!

I know you’re thinking, “Shut up, Crystal. It’s only April!”

BUT, Mother’s Day is coming fast – it’s on May 10th. That’s only 25 days away. And if you’re living a life that resembles mine in any way, shape, or form, then that feels like tomorrow. It is going to sneak right up on you if you don’t get on it now!

It can be a huge struggle to decide what the heck to buy your mom (or another special mom in your life) for Mother’s Day. She either has everything already or she is impossible to buy for or after a few decades of Mother’s Days, you’ve just plain run out of ideas. You want to get a gift for her anyway, though – even if it’s only a small token of the deep appreciation you feel for her.

Or maybe YOU are a mom and your kids or significant other are pushing you to tell them what you want. You want something unique and different but also useful because you have a hard time doing nice things for yourself. (Mmmm hmmm.)

Possibly it’s none of those and you just like to shop on the internet and find new things to buy.

Whatever the case, you need to check out Uncommon Goods. They have come up with a huge collection of gifts for Mother’s Day – you can browse by recipient or by occasion. The site excels at finding creative and unique items from individual sellers. They also strive to be environmentally conscious and socially aware. In their own words:

Founded in 1999 and headquartered in Brooklyn, New York, UncommonGoods is an privately-owned retailer that endeavors to feature unique designs and handcrafted gifts created in harmony with the environment and without harm to animals or people. We run all our operations out of the historic Brooklyn Army Terminal, including our warehouse where the lowest-paid seasonal worker starts at 50% above the minimum wage. We make it our mission to support and  provide a platform for artists and designers; in fact, half of what we sell is made by hand. Most of the products we carry are created right here in the USA, and about one-third of our entire collection incorporates recycled and/or upcycled materials. At the core of our company is a great respect for the integrity of the creative individual and the belief that it is our responsibility to use our business to impact the world in a positive way.

I’ve been a fan for years. They are my go-to site for housewarming gifts and for anyone who is tough to buy for. Many of the items end up on my Pinterest or just straight up in my house. I LOVE the fact that the company supports charities like RAINN and Women for Women International. They are just all kinds of good!

For this post, I’ve taken a look at the curated gift lists on UncommonGoods and pulled out a few of my own favorites  to create my handy-dandy Pinterest Board – Uncommon Mother’s Day.

Follow Ewokmama’s board Uncommon Mother’s Day on Pinterest.

UncommonGoods let me choose a gift of my own for Mother’s Day. It was so very hard to choose ONE thing I wanted, but I went with the set of 8 Bicycle Glasses. They are absolutely gorgeous – each has a brightly colored bicycle silhouette screen-printed in epoxy ink.

20905_bikesThey have a good weight to them, so they don’t feel too fragile OR too heavy in your hand – just sturdy and comfortable. And they are dishwasher safe, so they are still practical (satisfying the mom in me). I’ve already run them through the dishwasher a few times and I can attest that they came out looking as good as new!

Now, if you know me you know I do not exercise. At all. So a set of glasses with bicycles might seem like a strange choice, but bicycles have meaning in my house. When I met David almost seven years ago, he biked to work every day. Coincidentally, we worked down the street from one another, so he would ride by my office on his way to work, and I’d run downstairs to get a hug and kiss every morning. He also rode his bike over to my office at lunch so that we could picnic together under a tree we nicknamed Fred (Fred the Palm Tree). As an ode to our lovey-dovey early days, I’ve incorporated bicycles into our home decor in a few ways – we have a bicycle print I bought on Etsy hanging in our living room and our dishes have a bicycle chain pattern. Adding these bicycle glasses to the mix just made sense!

Now I just need these tall, customized tandem bike glasses to match. (Honey, are you reading this?)

So, look…I’m giving you a head start on picking out a gift for that special mom in your life for this upcoming Mother’s Day. Go forth and and find awesomeness at UncommonGoods.

And come back here to tell me what YOU are going to buy (or ask for) this Mother’s Day!

Disclosure: I was provided with the above-referenced product in order to provide my review but have received no compensation for this post. For more information on my reviews, please see my disclosure page and my summary of sponsored content.

To Simpler Days!

This year is trying to get the best of me.

My grandfather has been hospitalized several times and nearly died due to advanced liver disease. At one point he was in a coma and then he was awake and started planning his memorial…then one day he got up, got dressed, and decided since he hadn’t died yet he wanted to go home. We are all shocked as hell that he is doing relatively well now! I have no idea how long that will last, though.

During one of his hospital stays, things got even crazier when my grandmother had a heart attack, coded, and was life flighted to the same hospital my grandfather was at. A stent was placed and she was released a few days later. She looked amazing, all things considered, when I finally made it up to see her and my grandfather.

While those things were happening, we were getting Jack checked out for a fever in the first of three ER visits. That fever went away after the requisite two doses of antibiotics and nothing materialized from it, thankfully.

Not too long after, though, he had an allergic reaction to a breathing treatment he’s been getting for over a year. We marched straight from the Pulmonary department down to the ER and he couldn’t wear a mask because he couldn’t breathe…he recovered before a doctor saw him, though. (He won’t be on those breathing treatments going forward…)

A couple days after that incident Jack started developing a cold – probably something he caught in the freaking ER! He’s been battling it since and a week ago we ended up back in the ER again due to another fever. It’s been over a week now and the fever doesn’t want to let go, although it’s slowly losing its intensity. Jack has been out of school all week (right when we got his IEP in place, too!).

Meanwhile, the company where I’ve worked for the last 7.5 years is being acquired. My position is definitely one of the ones that will go away, but I don’t know exactly when (maybe May?). In the mean time I’m still working when I’m not home with a sick kid. We will be fine, by the way, but it’s still a big change that I have no real control over.

Tomorrow morning I’m taking Dez to see a pediatric neurosurgeon to assess if there’s anything we need to do about his plagiocephaly (probably nothing, but maybe a helmet, unless the universe has something else in store for us).

Also, David is taking a couple of college classes and we refinanced the house and Jack is Boy of the Year for the Leukemia & Lymphoma Society and the end of treatment is this week (!)…

So. I don’t even know what day it is anymore. I’m just chugging along and trying to keep my head above water. I’m looking forward to the end of Jack’s cancer treatment and life getting just a smidge simpler.

Please, let it get simpler.

IEPs Are A Full Time Job

We got the results from the school’s academic and psychological assessments of Jack on Wednesday. It’s 18 pages of assessment results that seem to require a degree in childhood education to understand. I’ve read and re-read the information and googled  my little heart out, but it’s still not clear what it all means.

On the academic assessment, the only issue that showed up was “math fluency” where he rated low average, and a slightly low score (but still considered average) in oral reading comprehension.

For the psycheducational assessments, he’s all over the board. Scores range from ‘borderline’ or ‘at risk’ on the low end to ‘superior’ or ‘above expected level.’ Jack hits every level in some area, which I think is what prompted this note:

“Jack’s unique set of thinking and reasoning abilities make his [cognitive functioning assessment scores] difficult to interpret.”

That is great! And yet…not-so-great. I love that my kid is unique, but being unique makes it quite difficult to identify how to help him be successful in school.

There are many notes throughout the pages of results that state “attention fluctuated” or “drifted off.” This is uneducated speculation on my part, but I’m guessing this is leading to an ADD diagnosis. (He was assessed for this through Kaiser recently, as well, but we don’t have the results back yet. In talking to his dad about the information and going through the process, I think we both feel Jack is likely to be diagnosed with ADD – just without the hyperactive part.)

One thing in the assessment results that stuck out was: “Jack exhibits a processing disorder in the area of attention that is affecting his classroom performance.”

From what I understand from the document and some googling, “slow processing” is a THING but it may or may not be considered a learning disorder (I think that depends on each district’s interpretation). And then, because of the part that says “in the area of attention,” it’s unclear whether this is just a result of something like ADD or if there is something else going on, too.

In any case, the assessments are helping with focusing on areas where Jack needs some help, either through accommodations (like more time to complete tasks) or some sort of specialized education. Naturally, most of what is described is not news to us at all, but it’s helpful to see where Jack is NOT having problems so that we can identify what the likely issues are that need to be addressed.

I guess I’m learning that IEP assessments are not cut and dry – which is why, I guess, there is nothing in these documents that say “your child has a learning disability” or “he qualifies for special education services.”

So, the following things were identified and may represent the source behind the low math and oral reading comprehension scores:

Processing Speed Score (WISC IV): Borderline (lowest score)
Narrative Memory (NEPSY II): Borderline (second lowest score)

Behavioral Issues (based on the Behavioral Assessment Scale for Children 2):

Internalizing Problems – Clinically Significant
Attention Problems – At Risk
School Problems – At Risk
Behavioral Symptoms – At Risk & Clinically Significant

We have a meeting with the IEP team next week to go over what all of this means specifically for Jack. Until then, I will continue to google my little heart out to try to wrap my head around all of this. In addition, I was able to get in touch with a case manager from Kaiser’s Psych department who will attend the meeting with us and be an advocate for Jack. Thank goodness!

I am hopeful that many of these issues will fade away as the chemo leaves Jack’s body; however, it’s good to be prepared in case they don’t. And, of course, there are late effects that can pop up long after treatment is over, as well. Sigh.

For those of you who have IEPs for your children, what resources do you use to prepare for these meetings and help your child navigate areas of weakness? I would LOVE tips!