Diapering in a Drought

California is in a severe drought. Like many others in the Bay Area (and just about anyone who has grown up in California and lived through many other droughts), our household has long been practicing water-conservation. That means there is not much we can do to cut back further – our lawn is already deader than dead and we dread laundry and dishes so much that every load is completely full anyway.

Having a baby does throw a bit of a wrench in our water conservation efforts, though. There is more laundry to do and being at home during maternity leave means more dishes, as well. When we found out we were expecting, we had thought we would use cloth diapers – one of the few things I saved from Jack’s infancy. But then the drought got worse – it’s now considered to be one of the most severe droughts on record for California. There is talk of fining households that don’t cut their water usage. Even worse, there are worries over drinking water shortages.

Considering this, we started thinking cloth diapering may not be the way to go after all.

There is a lot of debate about the amount of water required to wash cloth diapers versus the resources needed to manufacture disposable diapers and then dispose of them, and which type of diaper has the bigger environmental impact. Most studies seem to come to a similar conclusion – there is no clear answer as to which is better for the environment because availability of resources (water vs. landfill space) differs by geographic area. Landfill space is always an issue, sure, but the scarcity of water can reach emergency levels much more quickly – which is now what we’re looking at in California.

With these things in mind, I started wondering about alternatives to both cloth and disposable diapering. Aside from elimination communication (which I have neither the time nor the stomach to try), other options are gDiapers (with flushable inserts) and cloth diapering services. Unfortunately, gDiapers present many of the same problems as disposables, with the added concern over the possible clogging up of the plumbing in addition to the extra flushing required. Further, in our county they cannot be composted by our waste management company. Diaper services, on the other hand, use only prefold diapers (the kind that require folding and pinning/snappi-ing and a cover) – which I loathe due to the bulk and the lack of moisture-wicking. When I used prefolds with Jack, we easily went through twice as many diapers each day as we would have with other types of cloth and/or disposables. Using twice as much cuts into the benefits of using a service that washes them in bulk, no?

This diapering thing seems so much more complicated that it used to be.

I finally stumbled upon diaper composting services. Some of the same diaper services that offer drop-off/pick-up and washing of prefold cloth diapers also offer a disposable option – you can buy eco-friendly disposable diapers from the company, which will drop them off weekly and pick up the dirty ones to compost at their facility. The service eliminates the extra water usage issue AND saves us from sending more garbage to the landfill (and paying for a bigger garbage can)! Two such services here in the Bay Area are Earth Baby and Tiny Tots.

Right now we’re trying out Earth Baby (they offer a 1-month free trial). So far it’s working out fairly well, although I have to mention that Desmond is a super soaker and has leaked out of the diapers at night lately (in reading reviews, it’s an issue with some babies using the Naty brand of diapers, which are the only brand Earth Baby offers), so we’ve taken to using Huggies for nighttime diapering. The Huggies have to go into our garbage can, of course, but it’s only around 10 diapers a week so…we’ll take it; I can’t be washing sheets every day!

The diaper composting service is not a big money-saver, unfortunately. The diapers and wipes can only be purchased through the service and are more expensive (the service has to make a profit somehow). We are avoiding the cost of additional water usage and a larger garbage can, though. And, well, I am not sad that I’m avoiding the laundry involved with cloth diapers, either…cloth is soft and cute and great for sensitive baby skin, but extra laundry still sucks!

I’m no expert but so far, this seems like one of the most environmentally-friendly diaper options for Californians right now.

What do you think? Does the environmental impact influence your household’s diapering decisions? Do you have drought conditions to take into account in your area?

Desmond’s Birth Story

At 9:30pm on the evening of August 31 (two days after my due date), I started having regular contractions. They weren’t bothering me much but I started timing them just to get an idea of how far apart they were – since this was my second baby, my doctor had advised me to go in if they reached 7 minutes apart so that we could make sure I got two doses of antibiotics for Group B Strep prior to birth. The entire week prior to this, I had several nights where I woke up to contractions that got gradually closer together before petering out at about 8 minutes apart, so I had no real reason to believe these would be different. However, they were different – these contractions steadily got closer together over a couple of hours. I hung out on the exercise ball to help them along and around midnight they were moving right along at 6 minutes apart. I made sure they were consistent for a good hour before I called Labor & Delivery. I wasn’t sure I was in labor – the contractions didn’t seem bad enough to be real labor – but you never know, right?

David and I packed up our stuff and headed to Kaiser so that I could get checked out.

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I was put into an observation room and hooked up to some monitors at about 1:30am (coincidentally, it was Labor Day). After a bit over an hour, a midwife came in to check on my dilation. I was only at 1.5cm (same as I had been on the previous Friday) and she didn’t think my labor had really started, but she felt fairly sure it was close to starting. Not only that, but the baby’s heart rate had decelerated a number of times so she wanted to keep me there for more monitoring. So we sat tight and she came and checked back in around 3am. My contractions were 4-5 minutes apart at that point, so we decided I should go ahead and get admitted.

The baby’s heart rate was fine by 7am and the contractions continued at the same rate. At 12pm, we decided to start on pitocin since I still wasn’t in active labor; we figured that my body just needed a little nudge in the right direction. I had a lot of reservations about pitocin because my labor with Jack had been long and hard, but the midwife assured me that we would go slow with the pitocin and we could turn it down or off if needed.

My contractions certainly intensified on the pitocin. I spent time going between the exercise ball and walking laps with David around the maternity ward.

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By 5pm, I had still only progressed to 3.5cm, although the baby’s head had moved lower into my pelvis. I kept doing my thing and trying to move a lot with contractions. The pitocin was slowly turned up every so often and every 4 hours I also received a dose of Penicillin for the Group B Strep (sidenote: the antibiotics had me in more pain where it was going into the IV than my contractions – OUCH!!!).

Around 7pm I put on my headphones and cranked some music (Lana del Rey!) to help me through the steadily intensifying contractions. I started needing David’s help to get through them but I still felt like the labor was manageable without any medication. David made a comment about how nice all of the nurses and midwives were…

Then there was a shift change at about 9pm…

A midwife named Doris came into the room and outlined her plan for our birth. She immediately started saying that my contractions weren’t productive, that she was concerned about the decels in the baby’s heart rate (which hadn’t occurred for hours by that point), and telling us that I was going to get too tired to birth the baby if things didn’t happen more quickly. There was talk of epidurals (was I SURE I didn’t want one??) and a c-section if I got too tired to push. The more she talked, the more agitated I got, especially after she said something about how if we followed her plan she GUARANTEED the baby would be born by morning.

Doris was a full on medwife. UGH.

After making her initial rounds, she sent our nurse in and instead of increasing the pitocin just a bit as we had been doing, she CRANKED it according to Doris’ instructions. Within 30 minutes I was doubling over with every contraction and sobbing hysterically from the pain. The contractions were maybe coming a minute apart and I had no time to recover between them. I was a shaking, crying mess, and I held onto David for dear life. I felt like I wanted to die.

Doris came back in the room and checked me, said that I still wasn’t at 4cm, asked if I wanted anything for the pain (which I rated at 8-9), and then sent the nurse back in to turn the pitocin up AGAIN. It had been about an hour since it had been cranked up and I was not coping well. Thankfully David stepped in and had the nurse turn the pitocin down a bunch to see if we could slow things down and give me a break. It took a bit of time but the contractions slowed just enough for my sobs to quiet and I was able to get a few breaths in.

Doris came back in at some point and I started crying again and silently wishing harm on her person. As soon as she left, I decided two things – I would go ahead and get an epidural, and I didn’t want Doris anywhere near me for the rest of my labor. David called for the epidural and I begged the nurse to keep Doris away from me and instead send in a doctor.

The epidural was placed right around 12am, in between contractions. It was pretty quick and painless and the numbing started immediately. I still had incredible pain in my tailbone (which I am 99.9% sure I broke when giving birth to Jack), and the anesthesiologist said that the epidural wouldn’t touch that, unfortunately – I just had to get through it. :(

The doctor came in to check my progress then. Right as she was saying, “This is probably going to break your bag of waters,” there was a splash. The staff scrambled to change the padding underneath me and I said that I felt like I was going to poop. The doctor looked down, said it was the baby’s head I was actually feeling, and announced to the team that the baby was coming! The staff kicked it into high gear, but the baby wouldn’t wait – his head slid right out, then his shoulders slowed him just enough for the doctor to get in position before he SHOT OUT like a football. I didn’t even get a single push in!

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Desmond Eric

Desmond Eric was born to a room full of chuckling people at 9/2 at 12:43am. He didn’t cry – instead, he looked around and squeaked a bit every now and then. He was 7 lbs, 1 oz, and measured 19″ with a tuft of blonde hair.

We are totally in love.

He’s Here

On September 2, 2014, at 12:43am, we welcomed our new baby Desmond to the world. He measured 19″ and 7 lbs. 1oz. He was born without a single push on my part!

We are madly in love. Jack met him on his first day of life and said, “This is one of the happiest times of my life!”

Our dog Lambert is channeling Lassie and thinks he should come to Dez’s rescue at the the littlest cry. Lambert even leads David to me when Desmond needs to nurse. We keep trying to tell the dog that we have it covered but he clearly doesn’t think we’re very good at this baby thing.

I’m hoping to get the birth story up soon! Stay tuned!

What A Birthday Boy Wants

Note: This is not a sponsored post; however, it does contain affiliate links just for funsies.

Summer birthdays are tough – as I’m sure many of you know. So many of Jack’s friends are out of town on vacation or at summer camp, so we decided to schedule his party for a week after his actual birthday. He was not happy about having so little planned for THE DAY but we tried my best to make it a good day. He got cinnamon rolls and chocolate chip pancakes for breakfast, had a playdate with one friend who was in town and another with his cousin Isha, and we made a trip to Toys R Us (where he picked out a large rubber tarantula and some test tube aliens). It seemed to be a pretty good day to me, but he felt it was lacking – I’m hoping it was just due to pulse of steroids he still had in his system from the prior week.

This Saturday afternoon his birthday party will take place and we have a lot of people coming (way more than I expected)! This year Jack expressed his desire to celebrate his birthday at Rockin’ Jump, a place filled with trampolines and a foam pit. Ordinarily I wouldn’t spend this kind of money on a birthday party, but since my due date is quickly approaching, I decided it would be best to have the party outside of our house. Less cleaning, you know! So Jack gets his wish and will be joined by 14 other kids all jumping to their heart’s content for two hours. And then we will send them all home filled with cake…

One of the ‘perks’ of living with cancer (doesn’t that sound wrong?!) is that Jack qualifies for a free specialty cake through a program called Icing Smiles. Icing Smiles is a collective of bakers who volunteer to provide free specialty birthday cakes for kids facing critical illnesses. Last year he got a dream cake that was shaped like an Ent from Lord of the Rings. It was AMAZING:

entcake

This year he won’t get the over-the-top “dream cake” but he will still get something special. A baker located in Fremont (Anything Cakes) is constructing a custom cake that will be shark- or Dr. Who-themed. Jack will be totally happy with either so we are leaving it up to the baker’s discretion. I can’t wait to see what is created! A cake seems like a simple thing to a lot of people but birthdays have a lot more meaning for us these days and it’s awesome that the day can be made extra-special with things like this.

So…what else does an 8-year-old boy like Jack want for his birthday? His interests are definitely unique – he doesn’t like the usual stuff like Pokemon, Yu-Gi-Oh, Transformers, or Minecraft (in fact, he loathes them). Instead he wants things like this:

A “carnivorous rock” plush that he designed and GypsyGarden Etsy shop brought to fruition:rockdrawing

rock plush

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A creepy cymbal-playing monkey:

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Sticky slugs:

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Toys that “eat” things/people, like Clayface:

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And, just to throw us off, the random cute/normalish thing – a plush koala:

 

He’s also happy to get books and Legos, of course. He can never have too many of those!

I’m hoping Jack’s birthday party this weekend goes well and he has nothing but fun! The steroids will be mostly out of his system so he should be in a better mood overall.

And by this time next year…he should be DONE with chemotherapy altogether and be able to have a cancer-free birthday. WOOT! I know that’s what he REALLY wants!

Jack is Eight!

I can hardly believe it, but my big boy is eight years old. And what a difference a year makes!

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Jack, age 7 (July ’13)

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Jack Age 8 (July ’14)

He is shedding his baby face a bit more every year. He is 3″ taller and 3lbs. heavier than he was a year ago, putting him at 4’1″ and 51 lbs. now. He is only 13″ shorter than me! He is so much stronger than he looks or knows – he throws his arms around me and nearly bowls me over every time.

He is reading chapter books on his own. His favorite books are the Bunnicula series of books, but he likes anything with talking animals and magic.

He is still a child, but he has moments where he shows so much wisdom. He was having a rather difficult time on his birthday because he was disappointed in one of his gifts (the one that was the largest but turned out to be something he was not interested in). He told me, “I know I’m overreacting. I know it’s just one present and shouldn’t be the only thing I focus on.”

He still loves art (drawing in particular – he doesn’t have the patience for coloring and he doesn’t like the lack of control with painting) and Dr. Who is his favorite thing in the world. He does take breaks from watching repeats of Dr. Who by checking out Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles (shhh, don’t tell anyone – it’s a guilty pleasure for him), although he complains when he feels something in the show is inappropriate for kids.

Jack is overflowing with empathy. When I’m sick or tired, he brings me stuffed animals to snuggle with in bed and draws pictures for me. He tries to be helpful by feeding the dog and cats (I forget to reward him with tokens for it now and he never asks). When his cousin accompanied us to the toy store this past weekend, Jack asked if she could have a toy, too, so that she didn’t feel left out.

More and more, Jack is gaining independence. He helps himself to snacks out of the pantry and can pick out his own clothes. He spends time alone in his room with the door closed,  usually reading or drawing or playing with his legos or iPad. He recently took his first shower, which BLEW HIS MIND. He giggled at the feeling of the shower on his back and he said showering “feels like cuddling.” It sounds like he even prefers it to baths now.

There are still challenges, as there are at every age. He often seems caught between his childish urges and his maturing brain. He still loves his stuffed animals and sleeps with his plush menagerie (which most recently included a hedgehog, a giant tarantula, a tiny owl, the killer bunny from Monty Python, and a squirrel dressed as Darth Vader that we’ve named Darth Nut). He still struggles with a  fear of the dark and of various bugs (spiders, moths, mosquitoes). He is moody and has gotten in trouble more often lately – trying his hand at lying or outright defiance.

I am so proud of him. He’s smart, compassionate, loving, creative and funny. He is so very strong and brave, even though he doesn’t know it yet.

He is my amazing eight-year-old boy. I am looking forward to seeing what his future holds.

My Extraordinary Kid

What makes your kid extraordinary isn’t just the epic stuff. It’s the little things. The small moments that maybe only you see — and quietly celebrate every day. Jack and I have had our ups and downs as of late. He is growing and maturing, and yet still holding onto childhood as much as possible. He is nearly 8, and caught between two stages in his young life. And at the same time, he is fighting cancer with his every breath.

Sometimes it’s all too much for him.

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Last week we had his friend over for a playdate. When it was time for the playdate to end, Jack wasn’t ready. He had a full on meltdown, declaring that it was unfair, that he didn’t want to be around me, and that no one understood how he felt. For the first time ever, he threatened to run away from home. When we dropped his friend off back home, Jack dashed out of the car and into his friend’s house – I had to pick him up and carry him back to the car (keep in mind I’m VERY pregnant).

On our way home, Jack said, “You probably don’t like me anymore.”

To which I replied, “Jack, of course I like you. I love you! We all say and do things we don’t mean sometimes. I will always love you, no matter what.”

Later on that evening he calmed down and apologized to me, unprompted. He then proposed a punishment for himself – perhaps he could have 3 hours of revoked iPad time. I told him I would think about it. Jack is generally so well behaved that I have very little experience with punishments!

All evening he hugged me spontaneously and repeatedly declared that he loved me. I told him I was so very glad that he was feeling better.

Experiences like these are hard on both of us, but they teach us a lot. Life is complicated and we are both still learning how to navigate it. Cancer has really amplified the everyday emotions we have to face, so we have to be stronger than ever and team up to face it together. I am constantly amazed by how Jack handles it all – he is truly extraordinary.

When you’re faced with the challenges that we are, it helps to have organizations out there like Stanford Children’s Health – the largest Bay Area healthcare provider with an exclusive focus on children and expectant women. Whether your visit is routine or rare, Stanford Children’s Health is committed to providing extraordinary care for healthier happy lives. In fact, Stanford Children’s Health and Lucile Packard Children’s Hospital Stanford has been the top-ranked children’s hospital in Northern California for over a decade.

Thanks to Stanford Children’s Health and their dedication to extraordinary care for extraordinary kids, I was able to create a slideshow celebrating my kiddo and all of his awesomeness. Check it out.

Your kid is extraordinary. Show them how much you enjoy every moment together by creating a special video of your own!

I was selected for this opportunity as a member of Clever Girls Collective and the content and opinions expressed here are all my own.

This Is How I Nest

I think it’s safe to say that I’m officially nesting. It looks a little different than I thought it would, though.

Rather than focusing on cleaning and organizing (although I’ve done a little off that, too), I’ve been working on getting projects completed. It started with creating a baby book using Project Life products (PL Baby Book example found here). That didn’t take long (since the baby isn’t here yet), so I moved onto hanging pictures on the walls.

We’ve lived in this house two years now as of last week and most of the walls were devoid of pictures even though I had a ton of stuff already framed. So I took care of that (pic 1 and pic 2).

Most recently I’ve been working on migrating photos from the albums that our dog destroyed when we first adopted him into new albums. I’m using Project Life for this, too – I had two photo albums full of pictures from my trip to England and France 10 years ago (10 years ago this month, even!), 8 pages worth of journaling, and a pack of souvenirs that I’d saved. I still have to transfer the more of the journaling into the book but I have all of the pictures and memorabilia set up in the album now. (David does not understand this at all – he thinks I’m spending way too much time putting together an album that I might take off the shelf and look at once a year or so. To him I say PFFFT.) I feel accomplished.

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On the more traditional nesting front, this weekend we visited a furniture store that just opened up nearby and took care of getting one of the TOP things on my list of “I NEED this for the baby!” – a rocker recliner. Initially when I mentioned that I wanted one, David was totally opposed (due to the cost and the space it requires) but I ignored him because I’ve been through this before and I NEED a comfortable chair for rocking and nursing a newborn baby for hours on end! So he good-naturedly accompanied me to the furniture store and watched the World Cup while I negotiated with the salesman and made the purchase. Et voila:

chair

Now I’m focused on trying to find a place within a few hours of us to have a nice little getaway before the baby is born. So far this task has proved to be very challenging, as August in northern California means an influx of tourists and tons of local events (making everything much more expensive!). We don’t want to spend a ton of money but we really want to do SOMETHING before the baby is born (especially since our anniversary is 6 days after my due date). Hopefully we’ll stumble upon a deal or a quaint, little-known town to visit.

Or maybe a generous benefactor will come out of the woodwork and offer us something. WILL BLOG FOR VACATION! (Don’t worry, I’m not holding my breath on that one!)

Summer Tastes Like Freedom

dance-32193_640School’s out for the summer! YEAH!

This is big for us. Probably bigger (and better) than it is for most households. See, during the school year, Jack spends weekdays at our house and then all but one weekend a month with his dad (who lives an hour away). In the summer the schedule flips, so we will actually get to enjoy weekends and have leisure time with Jack on a regular basis! We’ll get to have play dates with his friends, too.

Not to mention that for the next two months our household will have a break from:

  • Homework
  • Packing lunches (with foods Jack hasn’t gotten sick of)
  • Strict bedtimes
  • Dragging Jack out of bed for school
  • Worrying about Jack going to bed on time
  • Being late or calling into work due to Jack feeling ill
  • The small annoyance of Jack’s teacher spelling his last name wrong regularly (it drives me NUTS)

David and I will definitely be enjoying the quiet time on weekdays, too. With our baby due at the end of August, this is going to be the last couple of months where we get to have stretches of time alone together without any kids to take care of. We will enjoy that little perk of shared custody while we can!

We have an exciting summer ahead of us for other reasons, as well. Jack’s 8th birthday is July 13. His Make-a-Wish is underway and he should have a completed TARDIS console in his room by the end of summer. In early August Jack is scheduled to go to Camp Okizu’s oncology summer camp where he’ll be away from his parents for a whole week – EEP. We are nervous about it and we’re not sure he’ll actually stay the whole week, but we figure we’ll give it a try. We think it will be good for him to get a little independence.

August will bring our baby and a new school year – Jack will start the 3rd grade. And then things will get messy (messier) again.

So for now, I’m going to try to enjoy a little bit of freedom!

So Many Experts, So Few Explanations

We’ve seen quite a few doctors over the last week to address Jack’s recent paralysis incident and an increase in headaches that don’t want to go away. Two pediatrician visits, one neurology visit, and lots of phone calls have occured. We have one more appointment Friday with the eye doctor just to make sure things are okay.

None of the doctors had answers for us. No one knows what caused the paralysis and the headaches seem to be tension headaches. Everything looks benign and so we will do nothing for now and hope it goes away (and the paralysis incident doesn’t recur). Perhaps being out of school will help.

Jack’s pediatrician has been great during all of this. He is really good at following up on what is going on with Jack even when we don’t reach out to him directly (usually we call the oncology clinic because we tend to assume whatever is happening is probably due to chemo). He took me aside after the appointment yesterday to talk with me privately, away from Jack. He wanted to know how I was doing and let me know that that we could come to him anytime – that he would figure out what is going on so that we don’t have to. He even went so far as to say he’d noticed that the oncology clinic seems to feel that I’m a worry wart since the things I report that are happening seem to differ from what his dad’s household reports. He doesn’t seem to share this opinion with them, and understands that kids are unreliable when reporting illness – and this is especially true with Jack.

To give an example, if I reported to the docs that “Jack was feeling weak” – it would be because Jack told me that he felt like a chicken filled with whipped cream instead of bones. Jack’s dad would usually not think anything of that kind of statement coming from Jack, other than that Jack is a bit goofy and unique in the way he describes himself. If Jack reports that he got a weird shivery feeling (but he doesn’t feel cold) – I would check his temperature (more often than not he’d have a temp, even if it was slight, or it would be an early sign he was coming down with a cold). Jack’s dad would just assume he was chilly.

I don’t know if this occurs because Jack spends more time with me or just that he tells me more about his feelings or maybe I am some kind of master decipherer! But unfortunately the differences in what is reported between households has the oncologist questioning ME instead of his dad. And I guess maybe they prefer to hear that Jack is doing fine on chemo.

This is partly why David is taking Jack to more appointments these days – to show that it’s not just me (and also to spare me the stress of dealing with these jerks). But it seems that a lot of the damage has been done in the oncology office’s eyes, so we just deal.

In any case, the talk with the pediatrician yesterday was both reassuring (that we have SOMEONE who understands what is going on and who will take the lead on monitoring Jack’s care from a holistic perspective) and frustrating. It’s pretty upsetting to feel that I am not being respected by my son’s oncologist, someone I have to rely on to cure and keep my son alive, and it seems the pregnancy hormones have me a bit more sensitive when it comes to feeling judged negatively as a parent. I’m having a hard time shaking it now that I’ve been reminded.

David and I avoided asking Jack how he was feeling this morning and just sent him off to school, fingers crossed that he would last the day. And it seems he has. There are only 7 more days of school left until summer break, so hopefully we can make it through and we will all get a break from the grind.

Google Shopping Express Pretty Much Rocks

Note: This is a sponsored blog post. In exchange for blogging about my experience with Google Shopping Express, I received a free trial membership and a credit to use the service. All opinions expressed are my own.

With the gazillion appointments we have to manage Jack’s health and this year’s addition of prenatal check ups for me (in addition to the regular life stuff like work), my time and energy have become even more limited as of late. Thankfully I live in an urban area where convenience is highly valued. And since Google is practically right in my backyard, Google Shopping Express recently launched in my area.

From Google:

Available throughout the Bay Area, from San Francisco to San Jose, Google Shopping Express is a same-day delivery service that allows you to conveniently shop from stores like Target, Raley’s, Nob Hill Foods, and Toy “R” Us in one online location. Whether you need a last minute pack of diapers to get through the weekend or a few forgotten ingredients to prepare dinner, Google Shopping Express can help fulfill any new parent’s shopping needs.

They have been focusing on parents but let me tell ya, this service is fantastic for any city dweller!

Last week both David and I were battling a horrible cold and Jack’s health started to decline, as well. We needed a few things that couldn’t be bought within a 10 minute drive of our home (even if we had the time and energy to make it to the store), so I looked to Google Shopping Express to help. I was able to place an order for a few things from a couple different stores and choose to have it delivered to my office in San Francisco. From Target, I picked alcohol prep pads, ZonePerfect Kidz Nutrition Bars, and a new screen protector for my iPhone. At the same time, I ordered a Snoogle Body Pillow from Babies R Us (side note: if you are pregnant, get a Snoogle! I have been sleeping SO MUCH BETTER!). Everything was delivered to my office in lightweight packaging within the 4-hour window I’d chosen. It took less than 10 minutes to place the order and to grab it from reception at work – a HUGE time saver over driving to the two different stores, locating the products in the store (and hoping they were in stock), waiting in line to make the purchase, and driving home again.

Maybe you love the whole shopping experience, but I DO NOT. I would much rather nap than go to the store.

The prices through Google Shopping Express are exactly what you would find in-store and you can input your membership number for the stores (like Toys R Us) in order to get your loyalty rewards when you order. If you’re buying commonly sold items like groceries, you can compare prices from different stores (Target vs. Whole Foods vs. Smart N Final vs. Costco – yes, they even have Costco!) so you don’t have to worry about paying more just for the convenience of having the items delivered and you can save a bit of money without trekking to a whole other store.

The whole experience made me SO HAPPY. The only thing that could have made it better would be if they delivered to my home in the East Bay – hopefully that option will be available in the future (especially by the time my new baby is born!).

So go, try it out! Google Shopping Express is currently offering new users $10 off the first order as well as 6 months of free, unlimited same-day delivery when you sign up for the free membership. You can order online or download the iOS or Google Play app.