Why I Marched on Oakland

On January 21st, I marched in Oakland as part of the Women’s March on Washington. I know there are some out there who don’t understand what marching accomplishes. I don’t always know the answer to that, but sometimes you feel strongly about things going on in the world and you can’t sit there anymore and do nothing. Sometimes, marching just feels right.

It was a diverse group that marched in Oakland. It wasn’t only women; there were people of every color, size, shape, ability, gender, sexual orientation, and flavor. The reasons why participants marched were many and varied.

Jack and me at the march in Oakland. Photo © Rhea Avalos.

Jack and me at the march in Oakland. Photo © Rhea Avalos.

Here are the many reasons that I marched (with my son Jack) yesterday:

  • To show that I will not be a silent victim of Trump’s fascist agenda and toxicity.
  • Because every person who marches builds up a critical mass that results in 2.5 million people, which shows that we are not a small minority of people who are concerned with the dangers of a Trump administration.
  • To show support to every person who will be targeted and harmed by Trump’s agenda and toxic atmosphere for simply trying to live their life:
    • people of color
    • LGBTQIA people
    • women
    • immigrants
    • those in need of affordable healthcare and protections against pre-existing conditions clauses
    • children who deserve to go to school without worrying about gun violence
  • To feel solidarity with my fellow citizens who also want to build a better America–an America that is constantly improving and not trying to return to the past.
  • To be part of a movement so big that it cannot be ignored.
  • To show my children what freedom means.

I will keep marching because it means something to me and reminds me what it means to be an American.

Truthiness Day 19: Religion and Politics

Day 19 → What do you think of religion? Or what do you think of politics?

I guess I’ll go with politics.

I research candidates and issues that are on the ballot when I vote, and that is pretty much as involved in politics as I get these days.  I avoid the news and the irritating campaigns – they aren’t helpful and tend to be paranoia-inducing.  I watch the occasional debate but more for entertainment because all of the content pretty much just sounds like lip service to me.  I find politics to be disheartening for the most part and very frustrating, especially local (California) politics because HOLY CRAP these people here like to spend money they don’t have.  I’m so very sick of bond measures…

Voting is kind of a shot in the dark, in my opinion.  You make your best educated guess and hope that in a few decades there will be more forward-moving than backward.

I think I mostly vote so that I feel entitled to bitch about things with which I disagree…

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